Mr. Methot

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Today we looked at place value with decimal numbers into the millionths. A lot of the concepts are very similar to place value with large numbers, except now are looking at numbers on the right side of the decimal comma. The most important part is to understand the vocabulary in French for each place value and what each word means.

You can reinforce with your child that 1 digit after the decimal comma is the tenths (dixiemes) place, 2 digits after the decimal is the hundredths (centiemes) place, 3 digits after the decimal is the thousandths (milliemes) place, 4 digits after the decimal is the ten thousandths (dix-milliemes) place, 5 digits after the decimal is the hundred thousandths (cent-milliemes) place, and lastly 6 digits after the decimal is the millionths (millioniemes) place. 

pg. 90-91 

1. Represent each number in a table of place values (I showed everyone in class what to do for this question).

 

2. Using the numbers in the yellow box, match each number with the letter for the correct place value of the 5 digit. In other words, for a), which of the numbers in the yellow box has the 5 in the ten thousandths place (dix-milliemes)? Then do the same for b), c), d), e).

a) ten thousandths (dix-milliemes)

b) millionths (millioniemes)

c) thousandths (milliemes)

d) hundred thousandths (cent-milliemes)

e) tenths (dixiemes)

 

3. What is the place value of each digit in the number 4, 524371?

 

4. Write each number in standard form (forme symbolique). 

ex. 3, 9586

 

5. Write each number in expanded form (forme developpee).

ex. 3 + 0,9 + 0,05 + 0,008 + 0,0006 = 3, 9586

Posted: December 3, 2018

The homework for tonight could be challenging. The students should at least be trying each question, but I don't want them spending over a half hour on these questions if they get stumped. We will be going over these tomorrow in class to clarify any uncertainties. 

1. Solve for the product of each multiplication.

2. Add the comma (decimal) in the appropriate spot in the answer (product) to make the answer true.  

4. Solve for the product of each multiplication. 

5. From the 3 options, select the correct answer. 

 

Posted: November 26, 2018

In math today we began exploring multiplication and division of decimal numbers using estimation. 

An example would be 2,73 X 8:  2,73 can be rounded up to 3, so 3 X 8 = 24 gives an estimated product for this multiplication. The important thing for students to understand is that 24 is not the exact answer for this question, but rather an estimation. The actual answer is less than 24, therefore 24 would be an overestimation in this case. 

Homework: page 94 #1,2,4,5

1. Estimate each product or quotient.

2. William paid 29,85$ for 3 tickets to a tower in Calgary. How much did it cost him for 1 ticket to the tower? Estimate the cost. 

4. Estimate the perimeter of each square given the length of one side. 

5. Estimate the length of one side of a square given the total perimeter of the square. 

 

** One thing to note: In English, decimal numbers use a point (ie. 8.56). However in French, a comma is used for decimal numbers (ie. 8,56)

Currently in math now we are working on plotting and identifying points on a Cartesian plane in the first quadrant only. One point of emphasis is that the first coordinate is always moving to the right, and the second coordinate is always moving up in the quadrant. Here is some terminology translated:

Cartesian plane = Plan cartésien 

Origin = Origine (0,0)

Horizontal axis = L'axe horizontal

Vertical axis = L'axe vertical

Coordinate = Coordonnéé

Ordered pair = Paire ordonnéé  (ex. (3,8)

 

Here is the homework for tonight:

1. Match each ordered pair with the correct letter from the Cartesian plane. 

2. Draw a Cartesian plane and label the axes. Plot the ordered pairs with their letter.

3. Same as question #2

4. Write out the ordered pair for each letter that represents an attraction at the Vancouver aquarium. 

 

 

Posted: November 5, 2018

I’m a little late with this, but here’s a video of an awesome Halloween themed game we played in phys ed class. There were many exciting Halloween elements in the game, including magic pumpkins, delicious witches candy, and of course the witches cauldron! 

Posted: November 1, 2018

2. For each table of values, write the expression that relates the numbers in the first column to those in the second column.

ex. 3a + 2 = b

 

3. a) Create a table of values to show the number of squares for the first 4 figures. 

   b) Write the pattern rule that relates the figure number to its number of squares.

   c) Write this pattern rule as an expression.

   d) Draw a diagram showing the number of squares for figure 7. How many squares are there?

 

5. a) Write the pattern rule that relates each number to its amount. 

   b) Write this pattern rule as an expression. 

 

Posted: November 1, 2018

2. For each table of values, write the expression that relates the numbers in the first column to those in the second column.

ex. 3a + 2 = b

 

3. a) Create a table of values to show the number of squares for the first 4 figures. 

   b) Write the pattern rule that relates the figure number to its number of squares.

   c) Write this pattern rule as an expression.

   d) Draw a diagram showing the number of squares for figure 7. How many squares are there?

 

5. a) Write the pattern rule that relates each number to its amount. 

   b) Write this pattern rule as an expression. 

 

Posted: October 24, 2018

2. Find the two step/operation pattern rule for each table of values. After the pattern rule has been figured out, add 4 more numbers to the table in the left column, and the corresponding values in the right column by applying the pattern rule.

4. Find the two step/operation pattern rule for each table of values. Then fill in the missing values in the table that are marked with a question mark. 

5. Find the two step/operation pattern rule for each table of values. Add the number 9 in the left column, and apply the pattern rule to figure out the corresponding value in the right column. Then add the number 28 in the right column and figure out the corresponding value that goes in the left column. 

page 61

3. Which of the following numbers are factors of 80?   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

8. Group these numbers into prime numbers and composite numbers:    59, 93, 97, 87, 73, 45

10. Which numbers from 70 to 80 are prime numbers? 

11. How many dates in September are prime numbers? How many are composite numbers? List them all in each group. 

page 65

1. Using a Venn diagram, show the factors of 18 and 24, and then the common factors of 18 and 24. 

2. List the common factors of each pair of numbers:

    a) 15, 25      b) 16, 40       c) 18, 42        d) 35, 60

3. Find the factors of each number and put them into a "factor rainbow". 

    a) 48           b) 50            c) 78            d) 62

4. List the factors for each number. Group these factors into prime numbers and composite numbers.

    a) 34           b) 40            c) 72            d) 94

5. Make a "factor tree" to find the prime factors of each number.

    a) 64           b) 85            c) 90            d) 76

8. Fill in the "factor trees" with a combination of numbers that works. 

 

I suspect these last 2 questions will be the most challenging, but we have practiced questions like the others a lot in class so the rest should be straight forward. 

 

Posted: October 11, 2018

In math class we are focusing on the following math terms currently: multiples, common multiples, factors, common factors, prime numbers, and composite numbers. Any extra practice at home to help the students get a strong grasp of these concepts would be great. 

As I mentioned on the Facebook page yesterday, practicing skip counting and multiplying help to make questions involving multiples and factors respectively much easier and quicker to solve. 

In French, the terms are: multiples, multiples communs, facteurs, facteurs communs, nombres premiers, nombres composés

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Added: Mon, Nov 5 2018
Rock Paper Scissors in Phys. Ed Class!